Plain Language Writing and Editing

Health Literacy
Helen Osborne helps organizations write print and web-based health information in ways that intended readers can relate to, understand, and use. With many years experience as a plain language writer/editor, Helen brings writing skills, health literacy expertise, clinical training, and patient perspective to all projects. Examples include:

Organizations can contract to work with Helen at an hourly rate, project fee, or yearly retainer. Contact Helen to discuss ways she can help clearly communicate your health messages. You can reach her by email at Helen@healthliteracy.com or call 508-653-1199.

Plain Language Materials for Average Readers

Plain language is more than just using short words. It includes setting a tone, organizing concepts, and using layout, graphics, and formats to help readers understand. While Helen has worked on a wide range of documents for many clients, here are 3 of her projects that are available to the public:

Websites for the Public

Health messages are now communicated in many formats. That of course includes printed teaching sheets and written booklets. Health messages are also communicated on websites and in other electronic media such as video scripts and audio podcasts. Helen can help with the writing part of those, too. Examples include United Hospital Fund’s Next Step in Care Guides and Checklists for family caregivers.

Reference Materials for Professionals

 Helen often writes about patient education and health communication. For 10 years, she was a columnist for the Boston Globe’s On Call magazine. Helen is author of several books. They include:

Want Helen’s help writing your health materials in ways readers can understand? Get started by emailing Helen or calling her at 508-653-1199.
Helen Osborne Writing Editing Services
Quote
“I did a ‘before and after’ of a chunk of text from one of our more complex topics (diabetic retinopathy) with our doctors on our committee, and they were impressed. They didn’t even want to read through the long, difficult passage that they had written themselves! That says a lot!“

Kierstan Boyd, Director of Patient Education
American Academy of Ophthalmology